how to write a persuasive essay 5

How To Write A Persuasive Essay

Normally three main points will be sufficient for beginning writers to coordinate. For more advanced students, they can simply increase the number of paragraphs based on the complexity of their arguments, but the overall structure will largely remained intact.

It’s given the readers a reason to act now, a sense of urgency. Create an authentic writing opportunity that motivates students to write persuasive letters to a target audience. Have students listen to or read examples of persuasive writing. Together, listen and look for words, phrases and techniques that helped the writer persuade the listener.

In the introduction the student will, naturally, introduce the topic. Controversial issues make for great topics in this writing genre. It’s something of a cliche in polite society to discourage discussions involving politics, sex, or religion for the reason that they can often be very divisive. While these subjects may not be the best topics of conversation for the dinner table at Thanksgiving, they can be perfect when deciding on a topic for persuasive writing. Obviously, the age and abilities of the students should be considered, as well as cultural taboos, when selecting a topic for the essay.

Educational Persuasive Essay Topics

https://essayshark.site

For instance, a college student giving a speech about Neil Armstrong landing on the moon in 1969 is an example of factual persuasive speech. The moon landing by Neil Armstrong is well documented and has concrete evidence that supports the fact that it did happen.

But, the point holds, the more controversial, the better. In a persuasive essay, or argument essay, the student strives to convince the reader of the merits of their opinion or stance on a particular issue. To convince the reader of a point of view, or to take a specific action, the student must utilize a number of persuasive techniques to form a coherent and logical argument. Factual persuasive speech is based on whether or not a particular topic is true, and is backed by concrete evidence. This type of speech persuades the audience as to whether something exists or does not exist, whether it happened or did not happen.